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The New Trust

TNT15 - The New Trust's 15th Anniversary

The New Trust

Polar Bears

Fri, December 14, 2018

Doors: 7:30 pm / Show: 8:00 pm (event ends at 11:30 pm)

$10.00

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The New Trust
The New Trust
Depending on which part of its story you choose to focus on, The New Trust is either extremely straightforward or tantalizingly complex. In one corner, the co-ed band from Santa Rosa—located about 55 miles north of San Francisco—plays unpretentious, fired-up indie-rock songs that bring to mind the mid-’90s heyday (think Boilermaker, Knapsack, early Promise Ring, etc.), are catchy as all get-out, and rarely reach the three-minute mark. In the other is a European tour the band booked only a year after it formed, lyrics that quote Jermaine Stewart’s “We Don’t Have To Take Our Clothes Off” while dissing religion and championing a DIY lifestyle, and a guitarist who originally thought her six-string would be used to sing her future kids to sleep.

“My goal was someday I would at least be good enough to play ‘Puff The Magic Dragon’ to our children,” says Sara Sanger, who happens to be the wife of singer-bassist Josh Staples, who also handles The Velvet Teen’s low end. To some, their married-and-in-a-band arrangement is another oddity, but it’s hard to get anyone in the band to see it that way—in fact, Sanger would probably still be completely focused on her photography if it wasn’t for Staples’ encouragement. “Josh was so serious, and such an optimist—he doesn’t do anything unless he knows that it’s going to happen. I didn’t realize that for a long time. I just thought, ‘Oh, this is just something he’s doing for his wife to make me feel better.’”
Polar Bears
Polar Bears
In a high-tech show beneath a four-pronged, 90-foot-tall canopy that he referred to as “our spaceship,” Henning dressed for the occasion in a jacket outlined in neon and dangled from a glowing, steering-wheel-shaped microphone as the band kicked into its encore. As he twirled madly during “Ghosts and Injured Knees” and then more lazily during “With Regards to the Doom of Society,” the two-hour, 10-minute concert took on a surreal air, with a disco ball reflecting shards of light against the balconies of Soldier Field, a tiny constellation in a galaxy of sound and glitter. Stadium concerts usually tend to feel puffed up and bombastic, but this was downright strange — and wonderfully so.
Venue Information:
The Phoenix Theater
201 Washington St
Petaluma, CA, 94952
http://www.thephoenixtheater.com/